Asking All Veterans

I started my first day of the year, pondering who needs help and how.  So many came to mind, but one stuck. Our courageous soldiers, who have been home for a while and the ones just arriving.

Some soldiers adjust fairly well at home and there are those who do not.  They struggle daily to hold it together.

It doesn’t matter when they step off the battlefield, there are many moments when they can still smell, still hear, still see the horrific events they try so hard to forget. They want to remember the names and ranks of their comrades, the special moments they shared, the bravery, the good they fought for, the ones they saved, the things they learned, the beautiful landscapes, the new discoveries. They beg to forget things we never knew they experienced.

We assume they will arrive home and function as they used to, in the comfort and security of family. We assume they remember how to sleep at night with both eyes closed. We assume they remember how to walk through a crowded store without scanning the entire crowd. We assume they are comfortable viewing and listening to the firework show on holidays. How about when they shower and hear the children bouncing around in the next room? What about the random plane flying over their home or the neighbor’s dog barking in the middle of the night or the cat hair that stands on end, the phone ringing or the knock at the door? We will never truly know how many times a day, they are put on edge, at alert, after returning home.

This can be frustrating and should be addressed to lessen the effects over time. I feel it is our responsibility to show our soldiers and their families and friends how to comfort and relax when this happens. All veterans experience the ability to still feel, when the moment no longer exists.

How Do You Comfort Yourself Or Your Soldier At Home When The Moment Strikes?

What do you do to snap out of it or how do you help your soldier snap out of it, in the heat of the moment?

How do you calm yourself or your soldier during a flashback?

How did you transition from the battlefield to the security of home?

Please tell the next soldier…

Read full article and take part in new forum

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About Christine Smith-Johnson

I am a widowed mother of three children, ages 11 to 19. I hope to encourage you through my trials and traumatic experiences. All my life, I dealt with heartache, and kept my head held high. Recently, I dealt with a heartache so big, it consumed me. Every part of me was lost and hurting. I never thought I would make it through. I did and I want to help you make it through your heartache, no matter how big or small it may seem to you.

Posted on January 1, 2012, in Dealing With Death, Health Issues, Parenting Issues, Paying It Forward, Relationship Issues, Uncategorized, Veteran Issues and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 7 Comments.

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  7. There are actually numerous particulars like that to take into consideration. That is a great point to carry up. I provide the ideas above as normal inspiration however clearly there are questions just like the one you bring up the place a very powerful thing can be working in honest good faith. I don?t know if greatest practices have emerged around things like that, but I’m certain that your job is clearly identified as a fair game. Each girls and boys feel the influence of only a second’s pleasure, for the rest of their lives.

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